Endangered UK Species

BIG BUTTERFLY COUNT - UK SPECIES ARE ALL IN DECLINE

JOIN IN AND TRACK WHERE THESE BEAUTIFUL CREATURES ARE IN YOUR AREA AND HELP CONSERVATIONISTS SAVE THEIR HABITATS AND CHECK FOR SIGNS OF STRESS, DISEASE ETC - THE HONEY BEES HAD PARASITES AND VIRUS INFECTIONS, PERHAPS OUR BUTTERFLIES ARE ALSO UNDER ATTACK!

WELSH DAIRY BOYCOTT!

SAVE THE WELSH BADGERS AND JOIN THIS CAMPAIGN NOW!

Back to

From this chart on the Guardian website you will see which native species are at risk and the areas where they are located in the UK

BADGERS

 "Ministers have reviewed the planned Badger Vaccine Deployment Project (BVDP), designed to vaccinate badgers against bovine TB in parts of England, due to start this summer.

The BVDP was designed at a time when culling was not an option. Since the policy on badger control is still being developed, ministers have decided that vaccination will proceed as part of the project in the area near Stroud, Gloucestershire, only, beginning in July for five years. Badger sett surveys will also be completed in the area near Cheltenham, Gloucestershire.  This reflects both the changed policy position and the need to consider carefully all public expenditure.

Trapping and vaccination is not now planned as part of the BVDP in the areas in Staffordshire, Herefordshire/Worcestershire and Devon where the project was due to take place. [ As at 24 June 2010]"

CLICK ON THE CULLING MAP TO SEE THE UP TO DATE SITUATION IN YOUR AREA + SUGGESTED EMAIL RESPONSES

UK & IRISH HARES in serious decline

"Irish hares are in serious decline owing to changed farming practices and patterns of land use, but their persecution for sport has also had a major impact. The Ulster Wildlife Trust has warned that hare hunting and coursing: "may prove to be the final straw for some of the more isolated populations." In an article on 23 May 2005, the Irish Independent placed the Irish hare alongside the corncrake and the marsh fritillary butterfly as species under severe threat in Ireland. In Northern Ireland a Special Protection Order was in force until 31 March 2008 banning the killing, taking, sale or purchase of Irish hares. Such protection will continue to be necessary until there is greater assurance about the stability and sustainability of the population "

SIGN THE PETITIONs URGING PROTECTION FOR THE IRISH HARE

Maddy Prior sings about the mysterious hare of myth and legend

hare
BROWN HARE

Let the Whale and Dolphine Conservation Society speak for themselves

"WDCS – we do a lot, so here is the quick guide:
Established back in 1987, the Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society (WDCS), is the leading global charity dedicated to the conservation and welfare of all whales and dolphins (also known as cetaceans).
In short, we are the world voice for the protection of these animals, creating pressure to bring about change.
What does that mean? Simple, we defend these remarkable creatures against the many threats that they face;
Hunting
Captivity
Chemical and noise pollution
Ship collisions (ship strikes)
Entanglement in fishing nets (bycatch)
Climate change"

There is lots more, so check it out!

BAT CONSERVATION TRUST

Find out how to recognise bats, protect their habitats, and become a volunteer in the UK area - join their Facebook page and check out the website for further info.

Need help with a bat? call 0845 1300 228 or click here

Bats in the US are threatened by white fungus on their faces!

"Bats are unsung heroes that control pests, pollinate many plants and support cave ecosystems. But in recent years a mysterious disease called white nose syndrome has devastated bats in the northeast as it has spread from New York north to Canada and south through Tennessee, leaving approximately one million bats dead in its wake. Afflicted bats sprout white fungus around their noses and often act disoriented, waking from hibernation too early and dying outside their caves.

Scientists have yet to understand basic facts about the fungus, such as where it comes from, how it is transmitted and exactly how it causes bats to die. With bats showing little or no resistance, the disease is expected to continue its speedy pace across the country into areas that include large networks of caves housing populations of endangered species like the gray bat and the Indiana bat.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has begun to develop an action plan to solve the mystery and keep bats alive, but the magnitude and velocity with which the disease has spread combined with the void of information about it make the need for rapid research imperative.

The Fish and Wildlife Service is accepting public comments on its draft action plan through December 26th.

What to do
Send a message, before the December 26th comment deadline, urging the Fish and Wildlife Service to move swiftly on its action plan and to focus on the steps that will do the most good for bats."

see more on the link and please sign the petitions

bat
insect-peacock-butterfly_120_thumb
RED SQUIRREL
10445201-hedgehog-on-white-background
butterflies-352