CAMPAIGNING GROUPS & AGENCIES

CPRE
Campaign for Rural England -committed to protecting hedgerows and dry stone walls – features which give beauty and character to rural landscapes and are valuable habitats for wildlife

HEDGELINK

A CUT ABOVE THE REST dvd
Introduction
Coppicing
Hedge Planting
Berry Production
Hedge Trimming
Hedge Styles
Hedgerow Trees

join your local Hedgelink group

HEDGE LAYING ASSOC OF IRELAND

- To encourage and facilitate the conservation, protection and appropriate management of hedgerows

- To promote the craft and profession of hedge laying

- To encourage and facilitate landowners in the management of hedges by laying, where appropriate

- To encourage and train people in the craft of hedge laying

- To establish, maintain and promote recognised standards of craftsmanship in hedge laying

- To research and document the tradition of hedge laying in Ireland

NATIONAL HEDGELAYING SOCIETY

"Maintenance of hedgerows is now part of good farming practice and the skills of the hedge layer are in great demand. "

WHY BOTHER TO SAVE OUR HEDGEROWS?

CAMPAIGN FOR RURAL ENGLAND EXPLAINS WHAT WE WILL LOST AND WHY WE NEED TO WORK TO SAVE OUR HEDGEROWS:

"The CPRE is concerned that hedgerow protection programmes could be at risk when the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) makes spending cuts in the autumn. "The Defra spending cuts could affect the money for schemes like this," Ms Marrington said. "I can see how hedgerows could be overlooked; they're taken for granted as being a part of the English countryside, and people don't realise how much they're at risk."

If hedgerows in Britain decline further, so too will those species that depend on them. Jim Jones of the People's Trust for Endangered Species is running a study of the impact of disappearing hedgerows on dormice, a species whose population has declined by 40 per cent in 20 years. "Dormice have disappeared from seven counties where they existed in the 1800s, at the same time as hedgerows have declined," he said. "Hedgerow corridors are crucial because they allow them to forage and move around."

Species in peril: An ecosystem teeming with life

Mammals

Dormice, harvest mice, hedgehogs, six species of bat, and polecats are all at risk as hedgerows decline. They rely on the covered corridors that allow them to move around.

Plants

The copse bindweed and the Plymouth pear are among the plants that flourish in hedgerows.

Fungi and lichens

From the sandy stilt puffball to the weather earthstar fungus, many fungi do particularly well in hedgerows. Lichens such as the orange-fruited elm lichen and the beard lichen are also at risk.

Invertebrates

Stag beetles, brown-banded carder bees and large garden bumblebees are among those at risk. More than 20 of Britain's lowland butterfly species breed in hedgerows, including the brown hairstreak and the white-letter hairstreak butterfly.

Reptiles and amphibians

Hedgerows connecting with ponds are vital for great crested newts to move through the countryside. The common toad, grass snake, slow worm and common lizard are also at risk.

Birds

Many woodland birds rely on taller hedges for breeding. The turtle dove, grey partridge, cuckoo, lesser spotted woodpecker, song thrush, red-backed shrike and yellowhammer are all in danger."

If you think a hedge may be about to be uprooted or is in danger, please contact your local council Environmental Officer, any of the agencies on
the left of this page, or ourselves.

IF IN DOUBT SHOUT, IT TAKES DECADES FOR ONE TO GROW, BUT ONLY MINUTES TO DIE

"National Action Plans have been developed which set priorities for each habitat and species listed, which includes a description of the habitat or species and details actions and targets for their conservation.

In additional there are over 160 Local Biodiversity Action Plans (LBAPs), normally at county level, which include actions to address the needs of the UK priority habitats and species in the local area, together with a range of other plans for habitats and species that are of local importance or interest. "

LBAP's in England
LBAP's in Wales
LBAP's in Scotland
LBAP's in Northern Ireland

LEGISLATION TO PROTECT HEDGEROWS

The Hedgerows Regulations 1997

The Hedgerows Regulations, made under the Environment Act 1995, were introduced in England and Wales in 1997 in order to protect this element of the countryside.
The Regulations prevent the removal of most countryside hedgerows without first submitting a hedgerow removal notice to the local planning authority. The Regulations also set out criteria that must be used by the local planning authority in determining which hedgerows are important. Among these criteria are:

The hedgerow incorporates an archaeological feature which is included in the schedule of monuments compiled by the Secretary of State under section 1 (schedule of monuments) of the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 or is recorded in a Sites and Monuments Record.

The hedgerow is situated wholly or partly within an archaeological site included or recorded as mentioned above or on land adjacent to and associated with such a site; and is associated with any monument or feature on that site.

LEGAL DEFINITION OF 'IMPORTANT HEDGEROWS'

The Hedgerows Regulations, made under the Environment Act 1995, were introduced in England and Wales in 1997 in order to protect this element of the countryside. The Regulations prevent the removal of most countryside hedgerows without first submitting a hedgerow removal notice to the local planning authority. The Regulations also set out criteria that must be used by the local planning authority in determining which hedgerows are important: a hedgerow is ‘important’ if it, or the hedgerow of which it is a stretch,
(a) has existed for 30 years or more; and
(b) satisfies at least one of the criteria listed in Part II of Schedule 1 of the Regulations.

These criteria may be summarised as follows:

the hedgerow marks the boundary, or part of the boundary, of at least one pre-1850 parish or township.

the hedgerow incorporates an archaeological feature which is included in the schedule of monuments compiled by the Secretary of State under section 1 (schedule of monuments) of the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 or is recorded in a Sites and Monuments Record.

the hedgerow is situated wholly or partly within an archaeological site included or recorded as mentioned above or on land adjacent to and associated with such a site; and is associated with any monument or feature on that site.

the hedgerow marks the boundary of or is associated with a pre-1600 estate or manor.

 the hedgerow is recorded in a document held at a Record Office as an integral part of a field system pre-dating the Enclosure Acts or is part of, or visibly related to, any building or other feature associated with such a system.

the hedgerow contains certain species protected by the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981; or categorised as a declining breeder, ‘endangered’, ‘extinct’, ‘rare’ or ‘vulnerable’ in Britain in any of the publications known as the British Red Data Books.

the hedgerow includes specified numbers and/or types of woody species.

the hedgerow is adjacent to a bridleway or footpath, a road used as a public path, or a byway open to all traffic; and includes at least four woody species.

The Local Planning Authorities may order the retention of important hedgerows.